Chris Breeds of North Bend and Melissa Leone

North Bend man runs half-marathon to raise money for Crohn’s disease research

On July 19, North Bend resident Chris Breeds took part in a half-marathon that raised $2.6 million for Crohn’s disease research and awareness.

On July 19, North Bend resident Chris Breeds took part in a  half-marathon that raised $2.6 million for Crohn’s disease research and awareness.

Breeds, president of Subterra Inc. in North Bend, was first turned on to the impact of Crohn’s disease when a family member was diagnosed with the disease.

It was through that experience that Breeds was motivated to join the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America and fight Crohn’s and Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).

The foundation introduced Breeds and his wife, Trish, to Team Challenge, an endurance training and fundraising program at the foundation that gets people to run or walk a half-marathon as a way to raise money for more research into Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

Breeds training began shortly before the race was scheduled to begin.

“I didn’t start training until about nine weeks ago,” he said. “They have a really good training program with coaches to help you get fit enough to run.”

But Breeds makes it very clear that the race wasn’t about him, it’s about the people he is trying to help.

“The whole thing is not about me, it’s about this terrible disease and raising money for a cure,” Breeds said.

To enter the race as part of the foundation, runners must raise money for  research.

“To be part of the race you make a commitment to raise a minimum of $3,200,” Breeds said. “If you haven’t raised the $3,200 you can pay the difference.”

Fortunately, Breeds along with the Missy Leone, wife of one of Breeds’ employees, who also ran the race, was able to raise a combined total of $11,000 for the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation. The entire Northwest chapter of about 636 people raised $150,000, and nationwide the event raised $2.6 million.

The half-marathon took place in California’s famous wine country, from Napa to Sonoma. In total there were 3,397 runners, 636 of whom were from the foundation.

Breeds wasn’t the only person in his age bracket however; there were 26 men between 60 and 64 years old.

“The oldest person was a 78-year-old woman who did it in just over two hours,” Breeds said.

Meredith Dennis, Seattle manager of Team Challenge, and a group of other Team Challenge members worked on plaques for the runners that featured a picture and that person’s motivation for running. The gesture was very touching for Breeds who woke up to find the plaque hanging on their hotel room door.

“It was just amazing,” Breeds said.

Breeds said being able to get out there and do something to change the world for the better is something anyone can do.

“It’s not something only young people go out and do. Old people can do it, too. You can do things that might surprise you,” Breeds said. “All you need to do is get up and go for it.”

 

More in News

Mary Lynn Pannen, founder and CEO of Sound Options, has consulted thousands of Washington families on geriatric care for 30 years. Photo courtesy of Sound Options.
Elder abuse cases are on the rise in Washington

Local agencies and geriatric care managers aim to increase public awareness about the epidemic.

The King County Library System Foundation is awarded a grant from Boeing

KCLSF receives an $80,000 grant from the Boeing Company

The Centralia Power Plant is a coal-burning plant owned by TransAlta which supplies 380 megawatts to Puget Sound Energy. It is located in Lewis County and slated to shut down by 2025. Aaron Kunkler/Staff Photo
National report outlines climate change’s course for the Northwest

More fires, floods and drought appear to be on their way for Washington state.

Mike Seal, left, and his son Ryan are owners of the Sigillo Cellars winery which is hoping to build a new production facility in downtown Snoqualmie. Aaron Kunkler/staff photo
Sigillo Cellars closes purchase on King Street Lot

Sigillo Cellars have purchased the vacant lot on the corner SE King Street in downtown Snoqualmie.

Legislators are working on several housing bills leading up to their 2019 session, including condo liability reform. Median sales prices of townhomes and low- to mid-rise condos were consistently and substantially lower than for single-family homes. Image courtesy of PSRC
Area legislators to focus on housing policy, funding in 2019 session

Tana Senn (D-Mercer Island) is sponsoring a condo liability reform bill.

King County adds 80 acres to Rattlesnake Mountain Scenic Area

Area governments and nonprofits purchased the remaining 80 acres of the 250 acre preservation area.

Police say porch piracy is primarily a crime of opportunity. Many criminals will see a package as they pass by and make quick, easy money. Kailan Manandic, photo illustration
‘Porch pirates’ plunder local packages

Eastside police departments spoke on the ‘porch pirate’ problem and ask locals to report the crime.

U-cut and pre-cut Christmas trees around the Snoqualmie Valley

As the holiday season approaches, several Snoqualmie Valley businesses are gearing up… Continue reading

The Giving Tree program marks season of giving in the Valley

The Giving Tree, a Kiwanis gift donation program, is returning to the Valley this month.

The Eastside strike team consisted of a dozen firefighters from local cities. They assisted with small brush fires and watched over a small community near Malibu as a fire raged on a nearby hillside. Photos courtesy of Jeff Storey and Dave McDaniel
Local firefighters aid in California wildfires

Firefighters from Eastside Fire & Rescue, Snoqualmie, Fall City and Duvall fire departments assisted.

Romaine lettuce, beef recalled just before Thanksgiving

23 people have been infected with a Shiga toxin-producing E. coli bacteria in 11 states.

Snoqualmie Council considers denying property tax increase, discusses budget fund allocations

The Snoqualmie City Council discussed not taking a 1 percent property tax increase for 2019.