A draft design for the Bendigo Properties LLC athletic complex proposes four outdoor turf fields to be used for baseball, softball and soccer, plus an indoor facility with 12 basketball courts. Courtesy Image

North Bend athletic complex to finish in Fall 2017; Mount Si sports move to Bellevue

While it won’t be finished within the originally planned time frame, progress has been made on a 12-acre, indoor-outdoor athletic complex in North Bend.

At its Nov. 1 meeting, the North Bend City Council approved a development agreement between the city and developers Bendigo Properties, LLC. The project, located between S.R. 202 and Boalch Avenue, includes plans for four outdoor combination turf fields, a 50-space parking lot in phase one, and a 75,000 square-foot athletic facility with 12 indoor courts and 90 more parking spaces in phase two.

The original completion date of the project was estimated to be this spring, but that date has slipped into the second half of 2017, as more tests are needed on the groundwater levels at the site and the developers meet other engineering requirements.

North Bend’s Public Works Director Mark Rigos said Bendigo Properties is currently doing infiltration rate testing, soil evaluation, and a determination of the season high groundwater table, because city code requires their project to do winter modeling. Because the site is entirely within the 100-year floodplain, making sure the development would not negatively affect the infiltration rate or groundwater is a priority.

Bendigo Properties also chose to use a series of infiltration trenches as its drainage design in order to avoid the large costs associated with larger drainage vaults.

“Their storm drainage design is unconventional, a lot of times developers would provide detention pond, infiltration pond, or detention vault, it could be underneath the parking lot,” Rigos said. “They chose a series of infiltration trenches throughout the site… It will save money for the project, going with this design if it works. A detention vault is very expensive.”

Wende Miller of Bendigo Properties said the groundwater testing will be done by Jan. 20, and the data will be compiled into a report. After that, they will be able to move forward with the city on the next steps.

“With the groundwater study, we had to have the equipment installed, we are supposed to go out there this week and get the information,” she said. “The equipment has been out there for a month, once they are able to gather that information, they can assess it and put together their report.”

After the seasonal groundwater monitoring, Bendigo Properties will need final engineering approval from the city and a clearing grade permit before construction, Rigos said.

“They also need to provide the city a bond for off-site sewer improvements, to have met the development agreement approved by the North Bend City Council,” he said.

Rigos said he expected the project to begin construction around October, once the developer acquires all of the permits they need.

Miller expressed some disappointment at not being able to finish the project this spring. If the original goal was met, the fields would have been used by the Mount Si High School baseball and softball teams for their spring seasons.

The new goal is to be ready for the Wildcat junior football program in the fall, she said.

Because Mount Si High School is in the midst of construction on a new facility, the baseball and softball teams cannot hold home games in Snoqualmie.

Betsy Evensen, secretary of the Mount Si Athletic Department, said that if the complex had been ready, the teams would have used it, but because of the tight timing they needed to look elsewhere to make sure they were able to play.

For the coming season, Mount Si’s home baseball and softball games will be held at Bannerwood Park in Bellevue.

Mount Si High School will not be able to play at home until 2020. Once finished, the athletic complex could be the new home for Mount Si sports until then.

More in News

Despite Supreme Court Ruling, activists fight youth incarceration in King County

No New Youth Jail Coalition members send Valentines to King County officials asking them to reconsider funding priorities

President’s emergency declaration sparks immediate legal backlash

Attorney General Bob Ferguson said his team will sue the White House if federal funds originally intended for Washington state are interrupted.

Bill targets sexual health curriculum in Washington schools

Senate Bill 5395 is co-sponsored by 17 Democratic representatives and introduced by Sen. Claire Wilson, D-Federal Way.

According to King County’s Mental Illness and Drug Dependency (MIDD) annual report, Seattle had the highest rate of people using services at 36 percent of the total, followed by 31 percent from South King County, 18 percent from the greater Eastside, and 7 percent from north county including Shoreline.
Study shows King County’s treatment funding is making progress

A document on the county’s .1 percent health sales tax was accepted Wednesday by the county council.

Captain Ron Mead, commander of the Washington State Patrol in King County, directs traffic on the top of Snoqualmie Pass. Photo courtesy of Trooper Rick Johnson.
Convoy leads Snoqualmie travelers to safety

Immense snowfall led to dicey conditions on the pass.

Courtesy photo
                                New Friends of Youth CEO, Paul Lwali, will replace Terry Pottmeyer.
Friends of Youth hires new CEO

Pottmeyer steps down; Lwali becomes new Friends of Youth CEO.

Russell Wilson and Ciara spoke Friday at the Tukwila Library to Foster students and other attendees as their Why Not You Foundation joined forces with the King County Library System and JPMorgan Chase to launch the DREAM BIG: Anything is Possible campaign. Photo by Kayse Angel
New teen campaign, DREAM BIG, kicked off Friday

Russell Wilson and Ciara were on hand to unveil limited edition library cards featuring the duo.

Bothell police recruits Amanda Rees and Dan Wiseman. Ashley Hiruko/staff photo
Police chiefs: More than a year to find, train new officers

HB1253 requires new hires complete basic training requirements within two months.

River stabilization project begins planning phase

The city of Snoqualmie has partnered with King County to install 400 feet of riverbank stabilization

Most Read