King County Library director resigns after code of conduct violation

  • Thursday, March 30, 2017 2:30pm
  • News

Gary Wasdin, director of the King County Library System (KCLS) since January 2015, has resigned.

“KCLS is committed to providing a welcoming environment for all of its users,” said Jim Wigfall, the library’s board president. “When it came to our attention that Mr. Wasdin violated KCLS’ code of conduct, the board took immediate action. Mr. Wasdin has chosen to resign his position effective immediately, and the board fully agrees with this decision.”

Aaron Vetter, communications contact for the library system, said he could not comment on a personnel matter. As a result, it is unknown what Wasdin is alleged to have done to violate the code of conduct.

KCLS, one of the busiest libraries in the United States, provides open, non-judgmental and free access to ideas and information to all members of the community. The System strives each day to create the best environment for its patrons.

“We look forward to continuing to serve our communities with the highest degree of integrity, professionalism and excellence,” said Wigfall.

Finance Director Dwayne Wilson has been assigned legal signing authority until an interim director is selected by the Board. Vetter said the search for a new director would be underway shortly.

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