King County Executive proposes discount for low-income solid waste customers

The proposal would help low-income customers better afford the basic costs of living.

  • Thursday, August 9, 2018 8:30am
  • News

Qualifying customers visiting King County solid waste recycling and transfer stations would be eligible to receive a discounted solid waste disposal fee if legislation proposed by King County Executive Dow Constantine is approved by the King County Council.

Under the Executive’s proposal, self-haul customers who show their ORCA Lift, EBT, or Medicaid (ProviderOne) card when entering King County recycling and transfer stations would receive a $12 discount off their fee.

Though King County’s solid waste disposal fees are some of the lowest in the region, low-income customers spend a greater proportion of their paycheck on these types of services. Providing a discounted rate to these customers means they could use more of their income on immediate needs, such as food, housing, and health care.

“Offering a discounted disposal fee for eligible customers means more people can take advantage of our responsible waste management services that benefit public health and the environment,” King County Solid Waste Division Director, Pat McLaughlin, said in a press release, who added that all customers can save money by properly recycling their materials when visiting recycling and transfer stations.

“A discounted disposal fee helps to ensure equity and a system that is responsive to its diverse constituents in delivering these basic services,” Penny Sweet, a member of the Kirkland City Council and chair of the County’s Metropolitan Solid Waste Management Advisory Committee, said in a press release.

The King County Solid Waste Division estimates about 300,000 customers would be eligible for the discounted fee.

There is no charge to recycle cardboard and scrap metal at the King County facilities that accept those items for recycling. Paper, glass bottles and jars, aluminum and steel cans, plastic bottles, jugs and tubs, and textiles can also be recycled at no cost.

While there is a fee for recycling yard waste and clean wood (unpainted, untreated lumber, pallets and crates), that fee is half the garbage disposal fee. Customers are reminded to make sure their recycling is empty, clean, and dry.

King County operates eight transfer stations, two drop-boxes, the Cedar Hills Regional Landfill, and many programs to help customers recycle. Learn more about the Solid Waste Division at kingcounty.gov/solidwaste.

More in News

VoteWA is a $9.5 million program that came online last May and is meant to unify all 39 county voting systems in the state into a single entity. Courtesy image
WA’s new voting system concerns county elections officials

VoteWA has run into some problems in recent months as the Aug. 6 primary election draws closer.

City Council approves EMS contract for Echo Glen center

Annual revenue agreement is for $16,578.

Si View Metro Parks make progress on aquatics facility plan

Si View Metro Parks is expecting the Aquatics Center Feasibility Study to be finished in August.

An aerial photo shows the locations of two earthquakes and five aftershocks in and near Monroe, which rattled the Puget Sound region early Friday. The first was the magnitude 4.6 quake at upper right, 13 miles under the intersection of U.S. 2 and Fryelands Boulevard SE at 2:51 a.m. The second, magnitude 3.5, occurred 18 miles under the Old Snohomish-Monroe Road at 2:53 a.m. The aftershocks followed during the ensuing two hours. This image depicts an area about 3 miles wide. (Herald staff and the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network)
Early wake-up call: Twin quakes under Monroe rattle region

Thousands of people felt them. They were magnitude 4.6 and 3.5 and hit minutes apart.

Courtesy photo
King County Sheriff’s Office has been giving ICE unredacted information

Both the office and jail have supplied the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency.

‘Feedback loops’ of methane, CO2 echo environmental problem beyond Washington

University of Washington among researchers of climate change’s effects in global temperatures.

Caller upset over stolen bong | Police Blotter

Police blotter for June 29 - July 4.

Warning sign for a road closure. File photo
King County examines options to fund roads and bridges

Shortfall is roughly $250 million each year; county may seek tax from unincorporated voters.

King County could loan 4Culture $20 million

The loan would be repaid by the organization and used to help serve marginalized communities.

Most Read