King County Council passes renter protections bill

The legislation is intended to prevent landlords from discriminating based on the source of a prospective tenant’s income.

The King County Council passed legislation this week that seeks to protect vulnerable people on the hunt for housing.

The ordinance, which was sponsored by Councilmember Jeanne Kohl-Welles, adds renters and homebuyers with verifiable incomes from Social Security, retirement programs, Section 8 Vouchers, and other government housing cost subsidy programs to the list of persons protected from landlord discrimination.

It builds on the county’s existing Fair Housing Ordinance of 1981, which prohibited landlords from denying prospective tenants and homebuyers housing based on their race, sex, religion, nationality, sexual orientation, disability status, and other characteristics.

The bill passed the council on April 16 with a unanimous vote.

“For many in our communities, stable housing is a ticket out of generational poverty,” siad Councilmember Jeanne Kohl-Welles in a statement following the bill’s passage. “It’s important to recognize how far we have come but remember how much we still have left to do to ensure all people are treated fairly as they seek access to housing.”

Bellevue, Kirkland, Redmond, and Seattle have all adopted similar policies to prevent landlords from denying prospective tenants housing based on their income.

Research has shown that source-of-income discrimination is a major driver of geographic economic segregation and prevents low-income tenants from living in wealthier neighborhoods.

jkelety@soundpublishing.com

More in News

Football coaches butt heads: Mount Si and Mount Vernon coaches display unsportsmanlike behaviors

Both school districts are investigating the behavior of their coaches following state playoff game.

Peter Gabryjelski and other fourth-grade students from Ms. Cuddihy’s class welcome veterans as they enter the Snoqualmie Elementary Veterans Day assembly on Nov. 9. Madison Miller/staff photo
Snoqualmie Elementary fourth graders honor veterans with assembly

Ms. Cuddihy’s fourth graders host a Veterans Day breakfast and assembly for the 10th year.

Sallal announced that they made repairs to the vandalized water tank on Nov. 3. They finished test results and lifted the no drink order on Nov. 10. Photo courtesy of Sallal Water Association
No drink order lifted on North Bend homes

Locals in 82 homes were ordered to not drink their tap water for about 10 days.

Snoqualmie Casino staff members surround a gaming table in the new private gaming room at Snoqualmie Casino. Photo courtesy of Tarah Smigun
Snoqualmie Casino gets private gaming room

The addition is the final casino upgrade of 2018.

Snoqualmie Council approves Salish expansion project master plan application

The Salish Lodge and Spa Expansion project has passed another milestone on the path to construction.

King County considers how to invest in Snoqualmie River flood infrastructure

County representatives met in North Bend to talk with residents about an investment plan.

Veteran’s, Josh Harris and Asa Palagi start security company in early 2018 called Cascadia Global Security. Photo courtesy of CGS.
Two veterans launch private security company

Asa Palagi and Josh Harris start Cascadia Global Security to provide personalized security

North Bend completes full renovation of NE 12th Street

North Bend has completed a long time priority project, the improvement of NE 12th Street.

Sallal announced that they made repairs to the vandalized water tank on Nov. 3. They are still awaiting test results before lifting the no drink order. Photo courtesy of Sallal Water Association
Police interview teen in connection to water tower vandalism

The affected North Bend Homes are still under a no drink order as Sallal runs further tests.

Most Read