‘It’s a great improvement over the old,’

‘It’s a great improvement over the old,’ patron says Fall City celebrates new library. The skies were gray Saturday morning in Fall City, but weather cooperated to allow the new Fall City Library to open with plenty of pomp and circumstance.

  • Wednesday, May 7, 2008 1:00pm
  • News

Among the first children to get inside the new Fall City Library

The skies were gray Saturday morning in Fall City, but weather cooperated to allow the new Fall City Library to open with plenty of pomp and circumstance.

“It’s the kind of day that tells me to get a book and go read,” said Richard Eadie, a King County Library System board member, who helped cut the ribbon with a crowd of children, eager to enter their new library after a wait of more than a year.

Built on the site of the old downtown library, a former bank at 33415 S.E. 42nd Place, the new building’s sweeping ceilings and airy glass-walled interior has 2,000 more square feet of space than the former location, not to mention more computers, more seating and more items for children and adults.

“It’s a great improvement over the old,” said Fall City resident Suanne Carlson. “I’ve missed having a library for over a year.”

“The people of Fall City always love to learn new things,” said Kathy Lambert, King County councilwoman. “Thank you for celebrating the heart of your community, which is expanding by having this lovely asset here today. This affords opportunity for lifelong learning for you, your children and your grandchildren.”

The 5,000-square-foot facility includes a community meeting room, so that “when you’re not in here reading a book, you’ll have the opportunity to visit with your friends and share the joys of living in Fall City.”

The $2.7 million library was built through a $172 million library capital bond, approved by voters four years ago.

“The system is really a family of community libraries, like Fall City,” said Eadie. “It’s through that, working as a family and community, that we’re able to build new libraries, such as the one here in Fall City.”

Fall City Library is able to connect patrons with five million books through the KCLS system.

Patron Patsy Calvin of Fall City said she hadn’t been sure whether she was going to like the new building.

“I do like it, now that I’m in,” said Calvin. “It’s a different perspective.”

Children and adults explored the building, trying out computers, checking shelves, climbing into chairs or getting a balloon animal made by a clown. Outside the large glass walls, the colorful Fall City totem pole could be spotted.

“I know the kids will love it,” said Fall City dad Josh Yancey, whose young son Joseph clambered into a teen-size chair to read a book. “I know he would probably come here every day if he could.”

“I’m glad it’s done, for the people of Fall City,” said Douglas Patur, an Issaquah resident who rode the bus to come to the library.

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