In brief

High river waters mean extreme

  • Friday, May 30, 2008 1:40pm
  • News

High river waters mean extreme

hazards for boaters

With river waters running high and fast because of recent warmer temperatures and fast snow melt, the Washington State Parks Boating Program is warning outdoor recreationists to stay out of rivers altogether.

“The rivers are swollen right now and near flood stage,” said Mark Kenny, boating law enforcement coordinator for the parks department. “They’re swift, cold and unforgiving. Only very experienced river runners can navigate them; however, all people should stay out of rivers at this time because the danger is so great.”

Kenny said because the water is moving very fast, boaters may find themselves unexpectedly falling into water so cold that it quickly numbs reactions and makes self-rescue extremely difficult. Because high waters in many rivers statewide are taking river levels up into the trees, rescue by experienced teams is challenging. The King County Sheriff’s Office conducted 11 rescues on Saturday, May 17, and the sheriff’s office and other local authorities may take additional steps — including closing river access — to keep people out of rivers.

Valley graduate receives doctorate

Chantal M. Irvin, a 1967 graduate of Mount Si High School, received her doctorate of education in education administration and supervision from Arizona State University. in Tempe, Arizona. on Thursday, May 8.

After graduation from Mount Si, Chantal attended Central Washington State University, graduating in 1971. She then moved to Gallup, New Mexico to begin her teaching career. In 1987 she received her master’s degree from Western New Mexico University.

Chantal retired in June, 2007, after 36 years as a teacher, principal, and assistant superintendent with the Gallup McKinley County Schools, to write her dissertation on barriers to school improvement in New Mexico public schools serving a majority Navajo student population. Her immediate plans are to return to education as a consultant for the New Mexico University in Gallup.

Chantal is the daughter of James O. Irvin and the late Chantal A. Irvin, of North Bend.

More in News

Roza Irrigation District manager Scott Revell inspects a water gauge in the lower Yakima Valley. If a drought pump is installed in Kachess Lake it would mean a more reliable source of water for crops in the valley. Aaron Kunkler/Staff photo
Puget Sound residents worried about Kachess Lake plan

A pump to supply much-needed water to Eastern Washington during droughts could affect recreation.

Cougar kills mountain biker, injures another near North Bend

It was the first fatal cougar attack in Washington State in 94 years.

5th Legislative, 8th Congressional District hopefuls file for office

Twelve will run for outgoing Rep. Dave Reichert’s (WA-8) seat.

This petroleum refinery in Anacortes is run by Shell, one of the defendants in the suit brought by King County. Photo by Walter Siegmund/Wikipedia Commons
Can King County win its lawsuit against Big Oil?

Legal experts think past lawsuits against the tobacco industry increase the odds of a favorable outcome.

Governor and Secretary of State to fund statewide prepaid ballot postage

King County, however, won’t get any of that money.

Snoqualmie Valley Record transitions to subscription model

The pre-paid subscriptions will be $39 a year or $3.99 monthly.

Suspect arrested for kidnapping after welfare check | Police blotter for April 23 to 28

Saturday, April 21 Suspicious Circumstances: Someone came to the reporting party’s door… Continue reading

Low numbers of Lake Sammamish kokanee raise fears of extinction

Only 19 kokanee salmon returned to spawn this year.

Eastside environmentalists turn up the heat on climate change

Residents are concerned about King County not meeting its greenhouse gas emissions targets.

Most Read