Governor proclaims Drowsy Driving Awareness and Prevention Week to be Nov. 5-12

  • Friday, November 3, 2017 3:29pm
  • News

Governor Jay Inslee has proclaimed Nov. 5-12 as Drowsy Driving Awareness and Prevention Week, for the fifth consecutive year.

Nationwide, drowsy driving causes more than 100,000 crashes a year with 40,000 injuries and 1,550 fatalities. From 2011 through 2015, in Washington State, there were 64 fatal collisions and 308 serious injury collisions investigated where a drowsy driver was involved.

According to the National Sleep Foundation, the top risk groups for drowsy driving are: Young people, especially men, 26 and younger; shift workers — working the night shift increases your risk by nearly six times; commercial drivers, especially long-haul drivers — at least 15 percent of all heavy truck crashes involve fatigue.

Drowsy driving is not only dangerous, it’s illegal. If you fall asleep at the wheel, you could receive a $550 fine for negligent driving.

“Drowsy drivers put everyone on the road in danger,” says Chief John. R. Batiste. “This form of impaired driving can be prevented by taking some easy, sensible steps before getting behind the wheel of a vehicle.”

Some simple tips for staying awake behind the wheel include:

Get a good night’s sleep before hitting the road

Don’t be too rushed to arrive at your destination

Take a break every two hours or 100 miles to refresh

Use the buddy system to stay awake and share driving chores

Avoid alcohol, drugs, and medications that cause drowsiness as a side effect

Avoid driving when you would normally be sleeping

For more information about drowsy driving and how to prevent it, visit drowsydriving.org.

More in News

Pro-gun activists gather on the steps of the Capitol building for a rally on Friday. Photo by Taylor McAvoy/WNPA Olympia News Bureau
Gun rights activists call for a halt to five firearm bills

Hearings for all the bills are scheduled for Monday morning.

The Washington State Senate chambers. Photo by Lincolnite/Wikimedia
Back in the majority, Senate Democrats moving fast to pass backlogged bills

Bills on pay equity, gay conversion therapy, gun regulation, and voting rights are all on the “to do” list.

New bill could put Washington salmon farms in jeopardy

The bill is at least partially in response to an August incident in which 30,000 Atlantic salmon escaped.

Lawmaker unveils ambitious plan to protect Salish Sea

The bill would aim to restore salmon while cutting down on toxins and noise pollution.

Washington state capitol campus. Photo by Visitor7/Wikimedia
State lawmakers hear a proposal to outlaw sexual orientation conversion therapy

The bill’s sponsor says that it includes religious protections and does not discourage families from seeking non-medical therapy.

Blotter: Man with assault rifle detained; ‘roaring’ sounds in sewer reported

Police and fire agencies in the Snoqualmie Valley responded to the following… Continue reading

The view of Mount Si from the Dahlgren property today will be affected by a proposed multifamily housing development, but maybe not as badly as opponents of the project fear it will. According to city projections, the planned landscaping, wide setbacks and a two-story limit on buildings closest to North Bend Way will minimize the visual impact of the project, which could break ground later this year. (Courtesy Photo)
Multi-family housing project on Dahlgren property progresses over Friends group’s objections

No one is saying that building high-density apartments on almost 18 acres… Continue reading

Duvall swears in fourth woman mayor, first woman-majority city council since 1932

The city of Duvall installed its new slate of officers, Jan. 2,… Continue reading

Lawmakers seek to bring campaign donations out of the shadows

The DISCLOSE Act would require nonprofits to reveal their biggest donors.

Most Read