Fall City sites to be sold to county for floodplain projects

Frequent flooding of the Snoqualmie River Campground in Fall City, and the sole road accessing it, has prompted a project that will eventually close the campground. King County’s Land and Water Resources Division has reached an agreement to purchase the property, owned by S Sterling Properties, as part of a larger purchase, totalling 21.5 acres of land along the Snoqualmie River at a price of $1.5 million.

Mike Creasey

Frequent flooding of the Snoqualmie River Campground in Fall City, and the sole road accessing it, has prompted a project that will eventually close the campground. King County’s Land and Water Resources Division has reached an agreement to purchase the property, owned by S Sterling Properties, as part of a larger purchase, totalling 21.5 acres of land along the Snoqualmie River at a price of $1.5 million.

The sale, expected to close in mid-December, will result in the eviction of some permanent campers. It will also result in new policies for the King County Council, said District 3 Councilwoman Kathy Lambert, who was surprised to learn of the agreement.

“It turns out that through all this, we have discovered that the (King County) executive can buy property without notifying the council… and we don’t have a policy on that,” Lambert said in October.

Also included in the WLRD purchase was the Rainier Wood Recyclers property in Fall City and an easement on the Fall City Farm property, for floodplain projects.

“It was part of making sure that we can deal with flooding in that area,” Lambert said.

“The sole access to a seasonal RV park on the property is inundated by relatively minor flood flows on the magnitude of a one- to two-year flood event,” added Doug Williams, King County spokesman, “and our primary interest in acquiring this property is for future flood risk reduction and erosion reduction projects.”

According to a 2015 proposal from the Department of Natural Resources, the campground and other properties will be the target for floodplain restoration work to “reconnect off-channel habitat and restore floodplain processes, edge habitat, hydrologic and sediment processes and floodplain forest conditions in addition to improving water quality.”

Williams said the county understood the campground was open from spring through fall and typically closed in winter.

Lambert wasn’t clear about how the resident campers would be relocated.

She said “Normally… whenever we’ve taken over a campground, we’ve found other places for people to go, and then it was permanent housing.”

The 10-acre campground portion is valued at $626,000. Funding for the overall purchase is coming from a combination of funds from the county’s flood control district, Floodplains by Design and the state Salmon Recovery Funding Board.

Calls to the campground were referred to Harry Gamble, who did not respond to multiple requests for information.

 

More in News

Snow expected on the passes beginning Wednesday

Holiday travelers should be prepared for snow on the state’s three main mountain passes this weekend.

Sound Publishing file photo
King County approves gun warning sign requirement

Warning signs must be posted in all King County gun stores and firing ranges.

Football coaches butt heads: Mount Si and Mount Vernon coaches display unsportsmanlike behaviors

Both school districts are investigating the behavior of their coaches following state playoff game.

North Bend council talks wastewater facility funding, 2019 property tax

North Bend city council discussed 2019 property taxes rates and a general facility charge increase.

Peter Gabryjelski and other fourth-grade students from Ms. Cuddihy’s class welcome veterans as they enter the Snoqualmie Elementary Veterans Day assembly on Nov. 9. Madison Miller/staff photo
Snoqualmie Elementary fourth graders honor veterans with assembly

Ms. Cuddihy’s fourth graders host a Veterans Day breakfast and assembly for the 10th year.

Sallal announced that they made repairs to the vandalized water tank on Nov. 3. They finished test results and lifted the no drink order on Nov. 10. Photo courtesy of Sallal Water Association
No drink order lifted on North Bend homes

Locals in 82 homes were ordered to not drink their tap water for about 10 days.

Snoqualmie Casino staff members (from left) Trevor House, Linda Yem, Sophorn Seng, Ross Garmon and Jan Wu surround a gaming table in the new private gaming room at Snoqualmie Casino. Photo courtesy of Tarah Smigun
Snoqualmie Casino gets private gaming room

The addition is the final casino upgrade of 2018.

Snoqualmie Council approves Salish expansion project master plan application

The Salish Lodge and Spa Expansion project has passed another milestone on the path to construction.

King County considers how to invest in Snoqualmie River flood infrastructure

County representatives met in North Bend to talk with residents about an investment plan.

Most Read