Fall City Day 2019 volunteer organizers meet to discuss final preparations before the event. From left: Don Oster, Kevin Hauglie, Todd Brown, Angela Donaldson, Lee Alexander and Kirk Harris. Courtesy Photo

Fall City Day 2019 volunteer organizers meet to discuss final preparations before the event. From left: Don Oster, Kevin Hauglie, Todd Brown, Angela Donaldson, Lee Alexander and Kirk Harris. Courtesy Photo

Fall City Day returns for 48th annual celebration on June 8

Fall City Days returns for it’s 48th year of community celebration on Saturday, June 8

Fall City Day is returning on Saturday, June 8, for its 48th annual event. The long-time community festival features several classic events and some new surprises.

The day starts early at with the pancake breakfast, hosted this year at the United Methodist Church as a fundraiser for the Snoqualmie Valley Relay for Life 2019. The annual Fun Run events are also held in the morning with a kids 1k, a 5k run, 5k walk, and a 10k run.

The parades will also return with the Kiddie Parade leading right into the Main Parade, featuring Grand Marshals Pete and Judy Nelson.

Angela Donaldson, volunteer organizer for the festival, noted a few new elements for this year. The first is Bubbleman, a Seattle-area children’s performer specializing in bubbles. Fall City Days will also feature a new food drive run by the Mount Si Lion’s Club who provide food for the Fall City Community Pantry, YouthCare and Friends of Youth.

Of course, the big annual Ducky Derby will return in the afternoon. Attendees an purchase a rubber duck to enter into a race in the Snoqualmie River. The winner receives a $500 prize and proceeds go to Snoqualmie Valley Schools.

The Fall City Community Association puts on Fall City Day as a school fundraiser, Donaldson said. A portion of the money raised from the event covers event expenses and operating costs, and the rest is donated to schools and groups like the Boy Scouts who help with volunteering.

“We keep a small amount to pay for the cost of the event, and we have at least 80 percent go to schools,” Donaldson said.

With 10 core volunteers and as many as 50 total volunteers on the day of the festival, Fall City Day is a community event.

“It’s a fantastic way for families to come out and see their neighbors and enjoy a fun street fair,” she said.

More information, including a schedule of events, is available at www.fallcity.org.

Rubber duckies cascade from the bridge to start the 2016 Ducky Derby of Fall City Day Saturday. Carol Ladwig/Staff Photo

Rubber duckies cascade from the bridge to start the 2016 Ducky Derby of Fall City Day Saturday. Carol Ladwig/Staff Photo

The Fall City Fire Department’s mascot high fives a group of kids during the 2018 Fall City Day Parade. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

The Fall City Fire Department’s mascot high fives a group of kids during the 2018 Fall City Day Parade. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Caleb Christensen leans in to take a big bite during the 2017 watermelon eating contest. Christensen was the winner the five to seven age group for the third year in a row. (Evan Pappas/Staff Photo)

Caleb Christensen leans in to take a big bite during the 2017 watermelon eating contest. Christensen was the winner the five to seven age group for the third year in a row. (Evan Pappas/Staff Photo)

More in News

The Snoqualmie Valley YMCA, built in 2011, could receive a 22,000 square foot expansion that would add an aquatics facility. File Photo
Snoqualmie explores expanding its community center

The project could cost between $12.5 to $16 million depending on features.

Pushing the limits of public comment; Snoqualmie council questions candidate’s methods

Donaldson uses video of his speeches during open comments for videos appearing on his website.

North Bend continues development push as water situation remains unclear

A recent decision means parcel marked for development was removed from Sallal’s service area.

Document logs highlight record requests from citizens in and around Snoqualmie

Public record request logs show what Snoqualmie residents really want to know.

King County’s Prop. 1 parks levy is passing

Initial results from the Aug. 6 primary King County Council races are also in.

King County Elections released preliminary primary election results Tuesday night. Madeline Coats/staff photo
Incumbent Ross and Armstrong lead city council race

1,429 ballots were returned out of 8,078 registered voters in Snoqualmie.

McFarland leading in the primary race for North Bend mayor

Primary results show Mary Miller and Darren Glazier likely to move on in city council race.

Dariel Norris and Gene Pollard leading in Public Hospital District 4 Pos. 2 race

Primary results show race is close between the three candidates.

A consultant working with store owner in downtown Renton. In 2018, Renton hosted a several workshops called “Creating Stellar Storefronts” funded through the Economic Development Partnership program. Courtesy of the Port of Seattle
Port of Seattle grants fund economic development across the Eastside

2019 Port of Seattle funding supports economic development projects in Eastside cities.