Fall City Day 2019 volunteer organizers meet to discuss final preparations before the event. From left: Don Oster, Kevin Hauglie, Todd Brown, Angela Donaldson, Lee Alexander and Kirk Harris. Courtesy Photo

Fall City Day 2019 volunteer organizers meet to discuss final preparations before the event. From left: Don Oster, Kevin Hauglie, Todd Brown, Angela Donaldson, Lee Alexander and Kirk Harris. Courtesy Photo

Fall City Day returns for 48th annual celebration on June 8

Fall City Days returns for it’s 48th year of community celebration on Saturday, June 8

Fall City Day is returning on Saturday, June 8, for its 48th annual event. The long-time community festival features several classic events and some new surprises.

The day starts early at with the pancake breakfast, hosted this year at the United Methodist Church as a fundraiser for the Snoqualmie Valley Relay for Life 2019. The annual Fun Run events are also held in the morning with a kids 1k, a 5k run, 5k walk, and a 10k run.

The parades will also return with the Kiddie Parade leading right into the Main Parade, featuring Grand Marshals Pete and Judy Nelson.

Angela Donaldson, volunteer organizer for the festival, noted a few new elements for this year. The first is Bubbleman, a Seattle-area children’s performer specializing in bubbles. Fall City Days will also feature a new food drive run by the Mount Si Lion’s Club who provide food for the Fall City Community Pantry, YouthCare and Friends of Youth.

Of course, the big annual Ducky Derby will return in the afternoon. Attendees an purchase a rubber duck to enter into a race in the Snoqualmie River. The winner receives a $500 prize and proceeds go to Snoqualmie Valley Schools.

The Fall City Community Association puts on Fall City Day as a school fundraiser, Donaldson said. A portion of the money raised from the event covers event expenses and operating costs, and the rest is donated to schools and groups like the Boy Scouts who help with volunteering.

“We keep a small amount to pay for the cost of the event, and we have at least 80 percent go to schools,” Donaldson said.

With 10 core volunteers and as many as 50 total volunteers on the day of the festival, Fall City Day is a community event.

“It’s a fantastic way for families to come out and see their neighbors and enjoy a fun street fair,” she said.

More information, including a schedule of events, is available at www.fallcity.org.

Rubber duckies cascade from the bridge to start the 2016 Ducky Derby of Fall City Day Saturday. Carol Ladwig/Staff Photo

Rubber duckies cascade from the bridge to start the 2016 Ducky Derby of Fall City Day Saturday. Carol Ladwig/Staff Photo

The Fall City Fire Department’s mascot high fives a group of kids during the 2018 Fall City Day Parade. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

The Fall City Fire Department’s mascot high fives a group of kids during the 2018 Fall City Day Parade. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Caleb Christensen leans in to take a big bite during the 2017 watermelon eating contest. Christensen was the winner the five to seven age group for the third year in a row. (Evan Pappas/Staff Photo)

Caleb Christensen leans in to take a big bite during the 2017 watermelon eating contest. Christensen was the winner the five to seven age group for the third year in a row. (Evan Pappas/Staff Photo)

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