The Raging River Riders Horse Club, here lining up for a Fourth of July parade, will have a booth at the Community Info Day Saturday at Fall City Library. Williams Shaw/File Photo

Fall City Community Association to host community info day at Fall City Library

How can a small unincorporated community help its residents get informed about events and organizations available to them? Send them to the library, naturally.

This Saturday, March 11, the Fall City Library will host an unusual event, an informal community information day organized by the Fall City Community Association. The free event runs from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

“This is a casual event designed to help people learn about local services and special interest organizations, many of which are free or low cost,” said Ashley Glennon, president of the FCCA, “and to meet your neighbors who share similar interests.”

The event was developed from FCCA discussions with, and a recommendation from the non-profit Leadership Eastside, whose mission is to equip, inform and connect local residents so they can become more engaged community leaders, Glennon said.

“They surveyed residents of Fall City and discovered that most folks were not aware of the variety of services available to them,” he explained. “We started putting together a plan of how we could improve our overall outreach and the idea of a community information event came to life.”

The association recruited local and county organizations to participate in the event, which is now booked up, with spillover. The entire library, not just the large back room, will be used for this event, Glennon said.

“We have never tried such an event at the library before but the library deserved kudos for volunteering to host as they are becoming an increasingly valuable community asset,” he added.

A partial list of exhibitors includes:

King County Councilmember Kathy Lambert’s Office,

King County Community Services Area,

Sno-Valley Senior Center,

Congregations for the Homeless/Snoqualmie Valley Shelter,

Fall City Arts,

Fall City Community Association,

Fall City Fire District (King Co. District 27),

Fall City Food Pantry,

Fall City Historical Society,

Fall City Learning Garden and P-Patch,

Fall City Metro Park District,

Fall City United Methodist,

Falls Little League,

King County Sheriff’s office,

MOMS/Encompass,

Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust,

Raging River Conservation Group,

Raging River Riders,

Snoqualmie Valley Alliance,

Snoqualmie Valley Transportation,

The Masons,

United Methodist Women, and

Valley Christian Assembly.

Not all of the exhibitors are from Fall City and not all the guests are expected to be, either. Anyone can attend, whether or not they live in Fall City, and the family-friendly event is for all ages.

“Fun and games are encouraged at every community booth,” Glennon said.

Exhibitors will be able to provide information, but no sales will be allowed during the event.

Service organization and clubs interested in becoming exhibitors can check on the availabilty of space at the event by contacting Glennon at glennon@gmail.com or Michele Drovdahl at michdrov@kcls.org.

Interested participants can simply stop by the library during the event and learn more.

As the event FAQ says, “You may be surprised at how many special programs, information resources and unique opportunities are available to you.”

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