Air quality worsens from wildfires

City advises residents to protect themselves from poor air quality.

  • Wednesday, August 15, 2018 12:30pm
  • News

The greater Puget Sound region, including the upper Snoqualmie Valley, is experiencing unhealthy air quality due to smoke from wildfires in Washington and British Columbia. Air quality monitoring shows air quality at unhealthy levels in the Cascade foothills.

Outdoor smoke contains very small particles and gases, including carbon monoxide. These particles can get into eyes and lungs where they can cause health problems, especially for those in high-risk categories including infants and children, individuals over age 65, pregnant women, and those with asthma, lung disease, heart disease, respiratory infections, or diabetes.

The Washington State Department of Health has the following tips for dealing with outdoor smoke.

  • Avoid physical exertion outdoors.
  • Stay indoors when possible.
  • Keep windows and doors closed.
  • If there is no air conditioning and it is too hot to keep windows and doors closed, consider going to an air-conditioned public location. See local options below.
  • If you have an air conditioner, set it to re-circulate and close the fresh-air intake. Make sure to change the filter regularly. Use a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter to reduce indoor air pollution.
  • Keep indoor air as clean as possible. Don’t use candles, fireplaces, or gas stoves. Avoid vacuuming as it stirs up particles already inside your home. Don’t smoke.
  • Check on elderly neighbors.

For more information about air quality from the current wildfires, visit the Washington Smoke Information website.

Locations to Avoid Smoke and Cool Off

Cool off and avoid the smoke for a few hours or more in the following locations: Local public libraries, Snoqualmie Valley YMCA, Snoqualmie Valley Hospital, Mt. Si Senior Center, North Bend Umpqua Bank Meeting Room.

Transportation to these public facilities is available throughout the Snoqualmie Valley by Snoqualmie Valley Transportation (SVT) for only $1 per ride for ages 13 and up. Information about SVT services is at www.svtbus.org.

More in News

Football coaches butt heads: Mount Si and Mount Vernon coaches display unsportsmanlike behaviors

Both school districts are investigating the behavior of their coaches following state playoff game.

Snoqualmie Casino staff members surround a gaming table in the new private gaming room at Snoqualmie Casino. Photo courtesy of Tarah Smigun
Snoqualmie Casino gets private gaming room

The addition is the final casino upgrade of 2018.

Snoqualmie Council approves Salish expansion project master plan application

The Salish Lodge and Spa Expansion project has passed another milestone on the path to construction.

King County considers how to invest in Snoqualmie River flood infrastructure

County representatives met in North Bend to talk with residents about an investment plan.

Veteran’s, Josh Harris and Asa Palagi start security company in early 2018 called Cascadia Global Security. Photo courtesy of CGS.
Two veterans launch private security company

Asa Palagi and Josh Harris start Cascadia Global Security to provide personalized security

North Bend completes full renovation of NE 12th Street

North Bend has completed a long time priority project, the improvement of NE 12th Street.

Sallal announced that they made repairs to the vandalized water tank on Nov. 3. They are still awaiting test results before lifting the no drink order. Photo courtesy of Sallal Water Association
Police interview teen in connection to water tower vandalism

The affected North Bend Homes are still under a no drink order as Sallal runs further tests.

Kim Schrier and Dino Rossi met at their first and only debate at Central Washington University where they clashed over health care, gun safety, taxes, and more. Photo courtesy of David Dick, CWU
Schrier leads Rossi in preliminary results

Schrier has more than 55 percent of the vote.

Callan and Ramos lead Legislative District 5 races

Results are preliminary and could change as additional ballots are counted

Most Read