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Year in Review - November

Unofficial flood maps finished

City officials and residents reviewed the preliminary Flood

Insurance Rating Maps for North Bend and Snoqualmie. Comments on the

proposal are due in January.

The maps show the floodways and flood plains in the Upper Valley.

Robber hits credit union

The Fall City branch of the Sno Falls Credit Union was the victim

of an armed robbery by a man in his 20s. The suspect held a small-caliber

handgun during the incident, police said. No one was injured.

Police tried to track down the suspect after he fled on foot, but

were unable to locate the man or the money.

Police levy fails

Carnation's $102,000 police levy failed by only a fraction of a

percent in the general election. That means the city will have about $100,000 less

revenue to spend on police services compared to last year.

The city said it would keep only two of the three deputies

assigned through the King County Sheriff's Department.

Charred restaurant demolished

After about a month of investigations, the River Run Cafe was

finally brought to the ground, but not without a glitch.

City officials said that the owners didn't have a permit to tear down

the building and ordered crews to stop working.

Crews continued the demolition the following day and city

officials refused to disclose whether the company received the appropriate permit.

Residents sound off on plan

King County Executive Ron Sims wanted to hear comments on

the county's comprehensive draft plan, and that's exactly what he got.

About 60 Valley residents voiced their concerns about development,

the comprehensive plan and their overall frustrations and fears with their

government.

Sims said an ongoing goal of the comprehensive plan is to slow

growth in rural areas and preserve the rural legacy and character.

Plan to drain

the rain

King County officials presented residents with a new plan that

would require all homeowners, business owners and commercial

establishments to pay a fee for groundwater control efforts in the area.

Residents would pay about $85 a year for the service.

If approved by the county council, the Rural Drainage and

Water Quality Proposal would go into effect in February.

Duvall police recognized

The Duvall Police Department — along with departments

from Kirkland, Seattle and the King County Sheriff's Office _ received the

1999 Law Enforcement Professional Award for their efforts to curb domestic

violence.

Duvall police officials said they have been successful because

they were able to hire their own domestic violence prosecutor and victims'

advocate.

Schools receive technology

Several community-driven groups in the Riverview School District

donated thousands of dollars worth of computers and software.

Thirteen Microsoft families donated more than $100,000 worth of products;

Carnation Elementary received 22 new computers and a core group of

volunteers worked to establish a technology foundation for the district.

The donations were in response to the technology levy that failed in May.

Falls Crossing

on hold

Pleas from local residents prompted Snoqualmie's

planning commission to extend the comment period on the Falls Crossing

development for another month.

Representatives from the proposed development said the

Environmental Impact Statement already addressed the concerns that were brought

forward.

Election results '99

In Snoqualmie, Marcia Korich-Vega beat out Carol Peterson for a

city council position. In Carnation, late write-in candidate Joan Sharp

defeated Mary Osterday. In Duvall, incumbents Jeane Baldwin and

Mark Cole took the two openings. And Initiative 695, which would eliminate

the Motor Vehicle Excise Tax, won.

Wilde resigned

Snoqualmie City Manager Kim Wilde resigned after 11 years of

service with the city.

Both Wilde and Mayor R. "Fuzzy" Fletcher declined to comment as to

the reasons why the resignation happened.

Director of Public Safety Don Isley became the interim city

manager while the city looked for Wilde's replacement.

Woman killed in storm

Marian Vincent of Maryland died after a tree fell on her at the

Rattlesnake Ledge Trail. Wind and rain contributed to the volatile conditions

in the forest.

Vincent's sister ran to get help, but by the time rescue workers arrived,

it was too late.

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