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Timeline for the Snoqualmie Preservation Initiative

The Snoqualmie Preservation Initiative involves a complicated series of steps between the city of Snoqualmie, King County and Weyerhaeuser Real Estate Co. (WRECO) that must be completed in order to protect all 9,800 acres that make up the initiative, including the Falls Crossing land north of the Snoqualmie Parkway.

If everything goes as city and county officials hope, WRECO will pay the bulk of the $13.3 million price tag. However, there are opportunities for the city and county to fund the initiative should the corporation opt out of the agreement.

The timeline is as follows:

March 15 - Snoqualmie City Council approves Puget Western Inc.'s scaled-down Falls Crossing development application for land south of the Snoqualmie Parkway; city and county signs Snoqualmie Preservation Initiative and funding agreement. If these steps fail, the initiative ends. That same day, the joint planning area process for Snoqualmie Ridge Phase II begins. If this step fails, the initiative could continue if the city and county agree to proceed without WRECO.

May 5 - King County executive sends sub area plan for joint planning area and an interlocal agreement amendment to the Metropolitan King County Council; Snoqualmie Mayor Fuzzy Fletcher presents interlocal agreement to the City Council. If these steps fail, the initiative could continue if the city and county agree to proceed without WRECO.

June 1 - Formal funding agreement signed by city, county and Weyerhaeuser Real Estate Co. (WRECO). If this step fails, the initiative could continue, and King County would make a down payment of $3.3 million.

June 4 - County adds Phase II property into urban-growth area, and city and county amend the interlocal agreement to increase the housing cap in Phase I by 286 units, with the contingency that WRECO makes the $3.3 million down payment. If these steps fail, the initiative could continue if the city and county have signed a funding agreement to proceed without WRECO. If the funding agreement isn't in place, the City Council resumes processing the entire Falls Crossing development application.

July 1 - Purchase-and-sale agreement closes. The joint planning area, or Snoqualmie Ridge Phase II, is added to the urban growth area. The city of Snoqualmie becomes obligated to pay $1.65 million - potentially more - in 2003, and WRECO must pay $2 million in 2005. Falls Crossing property north of the Snoqualmie Parkway is transferred to the city, with a 6-acre municipal site and a "conservation easement" on the remainder. Habitat Humanity of East King County receives 12.5 acres to build 25-30 more houses. King County receives interim protection of Raging River lands near I-90 owned by Weyerhaeuser. If the city and county proceed without WRECO, the city must pay an additional $350,000 in 2003 and $2 million in 2005.

2002 - Growth Management Planning Council ratifies addition of northwest parcels to urban growth area. WRECO obligated to pay $2 million in 2007. If this step fails, King County is obligated to pay $2 million in 2007.

Date to be set - Development agreement for Phase II signed. King County receives permanent preservation of Raging River lands. WRECO obligated to pay another $2 million in 2007. If these steps fail, there is no permanent preservation and King County must pay $2 million in 2007.

Date to be set - Development agreement for northwest parcels signed. WRECO obligated to pay another $2 million in 2007, for a total of $6 million in 2007. If this fails, the county pays $2 million in 2007, for a total of $6 million that year.

Source: city of Snoqualmie

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