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Vantage points: Shutterbugs find new ways to see the Valley’s scenic beauty

Last December, a long deep freeze made for a different kind of view of Snoqualmie Falls for photographer Brian Scott, caretaker at Snoqualmie Falls Forest Theater. “The mist from the falls had frozen to the cliff face, changing the browns and greens to a contrast of light and dark,” Scott told the Record. “This alone gave me a lot to work with. But what really sets this photo off is the reflection of the late afternoon sunset on the windows of the lodge and on Mount Si.” Scott won first place in the Valley Record’s Scenic Photo Contest. - Brian Scott
Last December, a long deep freeze made for a different kind of view of Snoqualmie Falls for photographer Brian Scott, caretaker at Snoqualmie Falls Forest Theater. “The mist from the falls had frozen to the cliff face, changing the browns and greens to a contrast of light and dark,” Scott told the Record. “This alone gave me a lot to work with. But what really sets this photo off is the reflection of the late afternoon sunset on the windows of the lodge and on Mount Si.” Scott won first place in the Valley Record’s Scenic Photo Contest.
— image credit: Brian Scott

As caretaker of the Snoqualmie Falls Forest Theater, Brian Scott has a special vantage point on Snoqualmie Falls and the surrounding Valley.

“From the scenic to wildlife to the yearly productions the theater puts on,” he says, “having a camera on hand opens the eye to see what it might not normally.”

From the small hill behind his house, he snapped the winning photo in this year’s Amateur Photo Contest—a view of winter color on Snoqualmie Falls.

“The mist from the falls had froze to the cliff face, changing the browns and greens to a contrast of light and dark,” Scott told the Record in an e-mail. “But what really sets this photo off is the reflection of the late afternoon sunset on the windows of the lodge and on Mount Si.”

“Like most photographers, this medium has been a lifelong interest of mine,” says Scott. “Unlike painters or musicians who have the ability to create great works out of nothing, the photographer’s art is to capture something that already exists; a moment in time. And in missing that moment comes a truth that re-do’s just do not happen. Whether it is a face on the street, the shuddering of a leaf under fall’s first bite or the dreariness of an unending rain pounding away at the intense green of moss and fern; all invoke an emotion that keeps me chained to a hobby that all of the family must endure.”

Scott and his wife Jodi work in ministry and take care of the theater. Along with their camp dog, Dixie, they are responsible for 85 acres of preserved forest land and 10 acres of park and camp facilities that host dramas, musicals and other special events.

“There are unexpected run-ins with the bear, lynx and cougar that make one pucker, but after the heart settles down, they move on,” says Scott. “Both of the positions we hold are a labor of love and we wouldn’t want it any other way, it is a very full and rewarding life. The camera, though, adds an extra dimension of wonder and there is nothing to take its place.”

Fly fishers

A photo hobbyist and grandmother who enjoys making images, Connie Som captured an image of flyfishers below the Fall City Bridge. She won second place in the scenic category.

“I headed out with my camera on a rather gray Saturday morning last autumn,” Som recalled. “I have always enjoyed driving through Fall City, with its small town ambiance and thought that one day I would like to photograph the trees that line the river.  On this particular day, I noticed several anglers down at the river, so went to take a look.

“I was a bit shy, not wanting to disturb their endeavors, but set my tripod up on the rocks and made a few images, including this one of the gentlemen in silhouette.  The fly casting was great fun to watch—a graceful art as well as a sport.”

She took the image using a medium-format camera, which creates six-by-seven-inch film negatives.

“I don’t use it often (it is heavy), but the large negatives are great,” states Som. “Most of my images are taken with a 35mm camera and are of family—usually grandchildren.”

A North Bend resident for the past 10 years, she learned to take a good photo while living overseas.

“I love the way black and white images capture your ‘moment in time’.  They communicate the shape and tonality of the subject in a dramatic and honest way,” says Som.

ª See more scenic photos on the Valley Record's Flickr page.

Terry Adams' photo shows autumn color on a rural North Bend lane.

Jane Bower’s vision captured sunlight through the trees at the Cedar River Watershed Education Center near North Bend

Connie Som won second place for her shot of fly-fishers under the Fall City Bridge.

Clara Leonard shows Mount Si in winter season.

Jenn Collins documents a summer evening at Rattlesnake Lake.

Yves Graindorge encountered fall color on the Little Si Trail.

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