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Past Time | Snoqualmie Valley Record historic headlines

Former Snoqualmie resident Jim Cummings shared this photo of his family, taken during in his youth in the 1930s in the Valley. Parents Gladys, at far left, and Roy Cummings, far right, stand with their children Wanda, Keith, Freida, Ethel, Jim and Wayne in front of their Ford Model T. The Cummings paid about $12 per month for the company home in an orchard north of the mill. Jim remembers attending the Snoqualmie Falls school across from the community hall, fishing in Tokul Creek and sledding on a cold winter’s day on Parker’s hill. - Courtesy photo
Former Snoqualmie resident Jim Cummings shared this photo of his family, taken during in his youth in the 1930s in the Valley. Parents Gladys, at far left, and Roy Cummings, far right, stand with their children Wanda, Keith, Freida, Ethel, Jim and Wayne in front of their Ford Model T. The Cummings paid about $12 per month for the company home in an orchard north of the mill. Jim remembers attending the Snoqualmie Falls school across from the community hall, fishing in Tokul Creek and sledding on a cold winter’s day on Parker’s hill.
— image credit: Courtesy photo

25 Years Ago

Thursday, Nov. 24, 1983

• North Bend expects to spend nearly $1.38 million in 1984, according to the preliminary budget introduced last week. If adopted, it would make an increase of 8 percent over the budget adopted last December for 1983.

• Should Fall City’s annual logging show be replaced with another activity, such as a draft horse extravaganza? Answers to that question and others concerning the yearly June celebration should come in the next few weeks. The logging show is a traditional celebration and recognition of the logging industry.

• Off-road vehicle use in the new Tiger Mountain State Forest is either incompatible with other recreation or a needed addition in the area. Those divergent views were expressed dozens of times Thursday in Upper Preston, when about 80 local residents got together to talk about the management plan for the forest.

50 Years Ago

Thursday, Nov. 27, 1958

• Plans for construction of a new plywood mill at Weyerhaeuser Timber Company’s Snoqualmie Falls branch were announced today by Harry E. Morgan, branch manager. Construction of a new building between Mill No. 2 and the barker will begin shortly after the first of the year. Completion is anticipated in early summer of 1959. “This increased production capacity means more jobs and greater utilization of the area’s timber resources,” Morgan said. The new development will provide a strong shot in the arm for the Valley’s economy.

• Once again, it is the time of year when we start to think of the gay holiday season and its colorful store windows and gaily bedecked homes and yards. One of the first groups to begin a concrete effort is the Valley Men’s Club of Carnation, which annually sponsors a Christmas Trails contest for the entire Lower Valley.

75 Years Ago

Thursday, Nov. 23, 1933

• Highway patrol officer Fred Grant, in charge of this part of the county, is currently driving a new ambulance patrol car recently purchased by the state highway department from the Sorenson Motor Company in Snoqualmie. The car is equipped with a short-wave radio set, which will pick up police calls and enable officer Grant to get quickly on the trail of any miscreants who may be trying to make their getaway over the pass.

• As the Record goes to press, word is received that Bill and Dean Norman, well-known residents of the North Fork, have taken over operations of Ghale’s Cafe in Snoqualmie. More details next week.

• North Bend residents watched in force when the sirens sounded Monday at noon. The stove in the office of the North Bend Timber Company had become overheated, and someone noticed the smoke and turned in the alarm. The fire was extinguished by chemicals and very slight damage reported.

• The Record hopes that every woman in the Valley attends one and if possible all three of the free cooking schools it is sponsoring at the Masonic Hall in North Bend Friday and Saturday of this week. Ms. Frances Constantine, home economics expert, formerly assistant to Prudence Penney, will conduct the school. A crowd of 500 women attended a like school in Kirkland two weeks ago.

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