Lifestyle

Out of the Past: Five-year-old Valley girl fights cancer, wants to go back to kindergarten; Snoqualmie blacks out after vandalism

The following stories made the news in the Valley 50 and 25 years ago, as found in the Snoqualmie Valley Record archives:

Nov. 14 1963

• A benefit dance is planned for Jodi Michelle Blagg, a blue-eyed, brown-haired little girl who celebrated her fifth birthday on Sept. 14. She is a happy, normal child in every way, except one—her days are limited for she is a victim  of cancer. Weak from six days of treatment at Children's orthopedic Hospital, she is anxious to return to her beloved kindergarten classes.

• The world's largest log stacker, a 60-ton-capacity giant capable of lifting an entire rail carload of logs 20 feet in the air, went into operation at the Weyerhaeuser complex at Snoqualmie Falls.

• Snoqualmie's main street and business section were blacked out last Tuesday night for nearly three hours as a result of a short, caused when two men threw a tape recording spool and recorder wire over power lines near the shoe store.

Nov. 10, 1988

• Students in grade school at Snoqualmie will be protected from some of the dangers of today's society as a result of a special program made available by the National Child Safety Council. Police officer Chuck Holton and reserve officer Terri Stokes are bringing the "Safety Pup" program to schools.

• Valley farmers are taking part in a pilot water quality project.  through the Puget Sound Water Quality Authority. A Stillwater project focuses on small hobby farms and sewage.

 

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