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Stage life: Fall City Community Association’s completed project takes spotlight | Photo gallery

Before officially cutting the ribbon on the covered stage at Olive Quigley Park, Vanessa Allen thanked the many people who helped make the stage a reality. Allen led the project, funded by the Fall City Community Association, and completed with a lot of volunteer help.  - Seth Truscott/Staff Photo
Before officially cutting the ribbon on the covered stage at Olive Quigley Park, Vanessa Allen thanked the many people who helped make the stage a reality. Allen led the project, funded by the Fall City Community Association, and completed with a lot of volunteer help.
— image credit: Seth Truscott/Staff Photo

Above, Aidan Stewart and Max Duerr try their best to feed a disinterested rabbit at Tuesday’s ribbon cutting ceremony. The rabbit, a 6-month-old giant named Baxter, was visiting from Baxter Barn.

Below, Sadie Duerr, 3, scoops soil into a pot for the peas she’s about to plant. She enjoyed all children’s activities at the May 1 ribbon cutting for the stage at Olive Quigley Park.

Fall City celebrated spring, May Day, and its almost-new community stage Tuesday, with children’s activities, music, and a ribbon cutting for the long-awaited stage.

“It was finished last year, in time for Fall City Days, but we never really celebrated it,” explained Angela Donaldson, former president of the Fall City Community Association and organizer of the day’s events.

A small but dedicated group of people turned out in the dicey weather to mark the occasion, and many of them recalled their role in building it.

“A lot of the labor involved was volunteer,” said Del Moore, who loaned the project his boom truck to lift the roof into place.

“Those are my ruts there,” he laughs, pointing at the ground in front of the stage. “It was pretty wet then.”

Wet ground was only one of the obstacles the project had to overcome, said Vanessa Allen, who led the project to completion.

“It’s not easy to build a semi-permanent structure here, so close to the river,” Allen said, so the permitting process was long and expensive, but Alan Sinsell, a King County Parks maintenance director helped smooth that process. Although the permit was very costly, Allen said the project came in at just under $10,000.

Funding for the project came entirely from the FCCA, which voted to use a portion of the grants received from King County Councilmember Kathy Lambert’s discretionary fund for the stage.

“It was a great thing to be able to use those funds,” Allen said.

Allen also thanked Glen Gordon and his wife Becky for building the structure with the timbers she found from a Bellingham company, and many others who helped the project along.

Alan Minner, current FCCA president, gave a brief history of Olive Quigley, for whom the King County Park is named, and of the park itself. He said the park had something to attract everyone and listed among its assets the picnic tables, the beautiful view and sports activities. “We also have art walk sculptures, and now we have a stage,” he said.

Allen cut the ribbon, held by two groups of children, and the event became a regular social activity, with cake and conversation, and children planting peas and feeding bunnies.

“This is how Fall City is,” said Donaldson, smiling.


 

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