The personal touch: Fall City designer Tami Jones combines beauty, function with owner inspirations

Tami Jones was working in a high-tech, computer-based job, but she was ready for a change. Encouraged by friends who knew she had a creative streak, she got hooked on the field of interior design. Now in her seventh year as a professional, Jones is gaining recognition for her skills in merging clients’ dreams with the realities of a livable space. “I’m still solving problems for people,” Jones says. “But instead of a computer, it’s a beautiful kitchen or bedroom.”

  • Tuesday, May 1, 2012 11:25am
  • Life

Fall City-based interior designer Tami Jones created an award-winning

Tami Jones was working in a high-tech, computer-based job, but she was ready for a change.

Encouraged by friends who knew she had a creative streak, she got hooked on the field of interior design.

Now in her seventh year as a professional, Jones is gaining recognition for her skills in merging clients’ dreams with the realities of a livable space.

“I’m still solving problems for people,” Jones says. “But instead of a computer, it’s a beautiful kitchen or bedroom.”

Her company, Tami Jones Interior Design, took first place in the Northwest Design Awards competition for her design in the “Best Individual Room: Traditional” category.

Wine cave

Her design creation, a personalized wine cellar carved from a crawl space in a Woodinville home, has an old world feel with modern amenities and natural materials.

The judges wanted to see green techniques along with a total transformation of the space. Jones delivered, working with EB Building Group, one of her go-to contractors, for six months to hollow out the space under a home for a wine grotto, with a flair inspired by the owner’s love of wine.

“This is a mix of old world and California wine country,” Jones said. “It’s a very cozy space that does transport you…. It’s very unique to the homeowner.”

Jones’ goal is always to achieve the look and feel a homeowner wants. After all, it’s not her house.

“My goal is that somebody walks in and enjoys the space,” she said.

Jones has always had an interest in having a beautiful home, but in a cost-effective way.

“That’s a big part of solving problems for the homeowner—how do you get what you can and stay within a budget? Everybody has a budget. Everybody wants more value.”

According to Jones, the earlier you involve a professional in a home design project, the more you can save.

A lot of people, when they try to do it themselves, they spend money and decide they can’t do it, then spend even more money to have it redone with a professional,” Jones said. “The earlier a pro can come in, just to get some do-it-yourself help or put together a plan to be implemented by a designer and a contractor, you can save a lot in the long run.”

Homeowners first need to understand their budgets. Laying out the financial ground rules before a project, and being honest with a designer about the budget, helps focus a project.

Owners should also create a wish list of their different inspirations for a space.

Jones brings a love of fabric, tile, and material things into her work, but the real reward is the interaction.

“Being able to work with homeowners to create a home, a space they love being in, is a huge honor,” she says.

• Learn more about Tami Jones at tamijonesinteriordesign.com.

 

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