The Si View Metro Parks district is looking to upgrade or expand their aquatic center facilities in 2019 and beyond. File Photo

The Si View Metro Parks district is looking to upgrade or expand their aquatic center facilities in 2019 and beyond. File Photo

Si View Metro Parks begins study on new aquatic center possibilities

Si View Metro Parks will be conducting a feasibility study on upgrades to their aquatic services.

In response to priorities identified in their comprehensive plan, Si View Metro Parks will be conducting a feasibility study on possible improvements to their aquatic center services.

Travis Stombaugh, executive director of Si View Metro Parks, explained that when the parks district updated their comprehensive plan they identified three priorities to tackle in the coming years. The priorities are connected trail networks, preservation of open space for recreation, and a new or improved aquatics facility.

In order to look into improved aquatic services, the parks district will be conducting a feasibility study to determine what, specifically, the community would like to see come to the Valley a well as what is financially feasible and what options would have the biggest impact.

Stombaugh said they currently have put out a Request for Qualifications for potential consultants to help conduct the study. He hopes to begin interviewing consultants applying to the request some time this month, have a consultant group under contract in October, and begin the process in November. The feasibility study itself, he said, should be a four to five month process at most.

The district plans to examine several options from upgrading their existing facilities to building an all new standalone aquatic facility. Stombaugh explained that obviously a standalone facility would be the most expensive option and could be unfeasible to operate in the long-term so they will focus on narrowing down the size and scope of the amenities the community feels are important and focusing on those. Looking at the benefit to the community will be their goal for the study.

Once the study begins, Stombaugh said there will be at least three public meetings and a survey for community members to make their voices heard and get their feedback incorporated into the process.

In a press release, the park district states that the current capacity of the Si View Pool hasn’t been able to meet the demand it has seen, so a new or upgraded facilities is needed.

The statement breaks the study down into six parts. Public outreach, which through survey and community meetings will get community members to work with staff in taking feedback on what they want to see offered. Market Analysis, to research other aquatic facilities in the region and examine how they operate within neighboring cities. A business plan to outline the how a new facility would be able to be funded and and operated in the long term. Facility programming which would determine what elements such as rooms and amenities should be included. Schematic designs and construction costs for possible alternatives, and a written report summarizing the report as a who and the methods used to come to a conclusion.

The deadline for Si View Metro Parks to receive qualification applications from consultant groups is 2 p.m. on Sept. 12. Once deadline has passed, the parks administration will begin working through the applicants to begin the process.

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