Out of the Past: Irene Scott circulates petition to save her land from county development; Couple captures would-be car thief, can’t get police to respond

The following stories happened this week, 25 and 50 years ago, as reported in the Snoqualmie Valley Record. From the Record’s archives:

The following stories happened this week, 25 and 50 years ago, as reported in the Snoqualmie Valley Record. From the Record’s archives:

Thursday, July 16, 1992

• Recent moves by the Bush administration will make it easier to thwart the Snoqualmie Tribal Council’s chances for regaining the federal recognition it lost in the 1970s, tribal leaders say. On June 9, the Bureau of Indian Affairs denied the Miami Tribe of Indiana federal recognition, holding that the tribe does not meet a continuous existence standard established through a ruling by U.S. District Court Judge in 1979. Native American leaders and representatives are fearful that the BIA now has the power to overstep Congress and strip federally recognized tribe of their official status, recorded in the federal register.

• Irene Scott is hoping public pressure will convince King County to let her keep the farmhouse she’s lived in for nearly 50 years. The county wants to buy Scott’s 30-acre farm off 428th Avenue SE as part of its land acquisition for its 320-acre Three Forks Park. Scott, 81, wants to stay and has decided to take her case to the public in the form of a petition. The petition asks that instead of purchasing the property outright or threatening condemnation, the county purchase development rights.

Thursday, July 20, 1967

• Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Weaver complained this week that they caught a car thief last Saturday night, but couldn’t get police to take him off their hands. Mrs. Weaver said they apprehended a young man about 11 p.m., Saturday, while he was trying to steal a 1962-model car from their lot. She and her husband held the would-be thief at gunpoint for a short while and let him go when no police arrived.

• The pigs on the Frank Laatsch farm are mute but important participants in research that is already helping make major surgery in humans more successful. In the operation, each pig has a piece of its aorta removed. In its place goes a synthetic tubular graft. Different kinds of grafts placed in the pig’s body are telling the researchers which heals best and which is best accepted by the body.

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