First-ever Green Snoqualmie Day marks start of successful Green City Day project.

  • Tuesday, December 12, 2017 12:19pm
  • Life

Across the Puget Sound more than 2,200 volunteers converged at area parks and green spaces from Oct. 7 to Nov. 21 to celebrate Green City Days. With nine participating cities, including Snoqualmie, this annual event connects community members in a common goal, helping to keep forested parks and green spaces environmentally healthy.

Kicking off the Green City Days series of events was Snoqualmie, with Green Snoqualmie Day, Oct. 7. With the help of 60 community volunteers, more than 650 native plants were added to Snoqualmie Point Park and Meadowbrook Slough. The city, Forterra, and Mountains to Sound Greenway sponsored the event.

Other Green Cities included Tukwila, Tacoma, Kent, Everett, Redmond, Puyallup, Kirkland and Seattle.

Overall this year, program participation was up 47 percent and plantings were up 120 percent.

Cumulatively, these events planted more than 15,000 native plants. This work was completed by 2,221 volunteers who clocked a combined total of 6,663 volunteer service hours. Volunteers came from all over the region and represented high school Key Clubs, elementary school students, area colleges and businesses.

Each Green City has partnered with Forterra to established a community-based restoration program that brings together local non-profits, community groups, city agencies, neighborhood leaders, and local businesses to support healthy urban green spaces. For more information about the Green City Partnership, visit the Forterra website at http://forterra.org.

Green City Day events were made possible with support from city staff, volunteer Forest Stewards and more than 20 non-profit organizations, including Forterra, EarthCorps, Mountains to Sound Greenway, Student Conservation Association, Sound Salmon Solutions, Tilth Alliance and local Audubon chapters.

Some 60 community volunteers helping to remove invasive plants and plant native species at Snoqualmie Point Park and the Meadowbrook Slough at the city’s first ever Green Snoqualmie Day, Oct. 7, take a break for a group photo. (Photo courtesy of Jim Avery)

Some 60 community volunteers helping to remove invasive plants and plant native species at Snoqualmie Point Park and the Meadowbrook Slough at the city’s first ever Green Snoqualmie Day, Oct. 7, take a break for a group photo. (Photo courtesy of Jim Avery)

More in Life

From Snoqualmie to nuclear subs, Zetec builds inspection tech

The Snoqualmie-based company builds ultrasound and eddy current testing tech.

Fall City Historic Signs map updated for 2018

The Fall City Historic Signs project will have fifteen signs throughout the city by the end of 2018.

Northwest Railway Musuem restores pews in chapel car

The Northwest Railway Museum is installing restored pews in Chapel Car 5

Fall City Historical Society features new theme for 2019 calendar

The Fall City Historical Society features their new theme

It’s time to get clear on recycling

A column by Michelle Metzler, Waste Management recycling education and outreach manager

Fall City Historical Society hosts music and history performance on Oct. 19

Fall City Historical Society is hosting a performance by Bob Antone and Tinkham Road on Oct. 19.

How do you define successful aging?

A column for seniors of the Snoqualmie Valley.

Fall into Wellness | Healthy living

Steps to take right now rather than waiting for the new year

Elected members of the Snoqualmie Tribal Council meet with leaders from the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance to present a check for $1.4 million. From left Dr. Nancy Davidson, executive director and president SCCA, Suzanne Sailto, Snoqualmie Tribal Council, Jolene Williams, Snoqualmie Tribal secretary, Steve de los Angeles, Snoqualmie Tribal deputy secretary, Bob de los Angeles, Snoqualmie Tribal chairman, Michael Ross, Snoqualmie Tribal vice chair, Kari Glover, chair SCCA Board of Directors, Norm Hubbard, executive vice president SCCA, Linda Mattox, chair SCCA Board of Directors Development Committee, Dr. Terry McDonnell, vice president of clinical operations and chief nurse executive SCCA. Photo courtesy of the Snoqualmie Tribe.
Snoqualmie Tribe donates more than $3 million

Donations to support health initiatives regarding tobacco and problem gambling.

Most Read