‘Death Trap: A Thriller in Two Acts’

The new show will run at Valley Center Stage from May 11 to May 26.

  • Thursday, May 3, 2018 8:30am
  • Life

Sidney Bruhl, a successful writer of Broadway thrillers, is struggling to overcome a dry spell which has resulted in a string of failures and a shortage of funds.

He needs to solve this shortage of funds quickly so he devises a clever plan with his wife’s help, inviting an eager former student to his home after reading the student’s well-crafted play. The student accepts readily. And, thus, the suspense begins mounting steadily with devilish cleverness, twisting and churning to the bitter end. Described as a comedy-thriller and a play within a play, it will bring you bouncing along to the startling and shocking conclusion

Directed by Alan Wilke. His most recent directing credits at VCS include Five Women Wearing the Same Dress and Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Christmas Carol. Performances begin May 11 and will run through May 26 on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and on Sunday May 20 at 2 p.m.

The cast includes Brenden Elwood (North Bend) as Sidney Bruhl; Rochelle Wyatt (Issaquah) as Myra Bruhl; Dylan Cook (Issaquah) as Clifford Anderson; Mary Sheehan (Seattle) as Helga Ten Dorp; and Tim Platt (Snohomish) as Porter Milgrim.

Valley Center Stage was founded in 2003 by Gary Schwartz, an actor, improv teacher and award winning author of The King of Average. Valley Center Stage is an all-volunteer community theater, committed to bringing quality programs to the valley. VCS is located in the heart of downtown North Bend in the historic Mason building above the bike shop.

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