California Casualty supports Washington Schools Honorees

Four local schools were named as U.S. Department of Education Green Ribbon Schools awardees.

  • Thursday, June 7, 2018 8:30am
  • Life

California Casualty joins the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction in congratulating the four Washington State schools that have been named 2018 U.S. Department of Education Green Ribbon Schools awardees.

Broad View Elementary, Carnation Elementary, Eatonville Elementary and Wayerhaeuser Elementary are among 46 schools, six districts and six post-secondary institutions across the nation that achieved the honor.

To reach Green Ribbon School status, the districts and schools had to meet three key pillars:

  • Reducing environmental impacts and costs.
  • Improving the health and wellness of students and staff.
  • Providing effective environmental and sustainability education, incorporating Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM); civic skills and green career pathways.

Broad View Elementary School has focused on saving both energy and water. The school’s solid waste has been reduced by 30 percent since their composting program began, led by the fourth graders.

Carnation Elementary has long been a part of the King County Green Schools program and is now a “Level 4” sustaining school, which means they add a new sustainability project each year. This year, a student team is working on getting water bottle filling stations and a reusable water bottle for every student in the school.

Eatonville Elementary School has a strong focus on STEM learning, as well as other content areas such as ELA and the Arts, all engaged through a lens of environmental learning. Extensive community partnerships support this work.

Weyerhaeuser Elementary School has a strong tie to the land, and students learn in their school’s Wildcat Woods as well as the district’s new farm. Food service is beginning to outline a process to serve local farm produce in the cafeteria.

This is the seventh year the U.S. Dept. of Education has run the Green Ribbon Schools awards program. The aim of the department is to inspire schools, districts, and higher education institutions to strive for 21st century excellence. Washington is among states with the most Green Ribbon awardees this year, surpassed only by Georgia and California, which have five recognized schools.

As the Green Ribbon Schools Local Sponsor, California Casualty will provide $1,250 to each Washington awardee to continue sustainability efforts in their schools or help with expenses traveling to the national honors ceremony in Washington, D.C., in September.

“You have accomplished a great feat in the service of your environment,” said superintendent of Public Instruction Chris Reykdal in a press release. “Thank you for leading the way in this important mission that impacts everyone. With your positive example, Washington students can practice the values of sustainability, conservation, and they can engage in green industries statewide.”

“We’ve been impressed how Washington students and schools have addressed sustainability and other environmental issues. We are thrilled to support this valuable program and congratulate the four schools who have achieved this prestigious honor,” California Casualty assistant vice president, Brian Goodman, who will visit each winning school to present a check and a special plaque, said in a press release. “California Casualty has partnered with NEA Member Benefits in Washington since 2001 to serve and support dedicated teachers and educational support professionals who engage and educate students.”

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