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Cascade View students share science, art

Christopher Teufel, a third grade student at Cascade View Elementary School, gazes at marshmallows that are shrinking in a vacuum, during an experiment conducted by Mount Si High School students. Younger pupils munched on the minimized mallows after each demonstration. - Seth Truscott / Snoqualmie Valley Record
Christopher Teufel, a third grade student at Cascade View Elementary School, gazes at marshmallows that are shrinking in a vacuum, during an experiment conducted by Mount Si High School students. Younger pupils munched on the minimized mallows after each demonstration.
— image credit: Seth Truscott / Snoqualmie Valley Record

Cascade View Elementary students explored science in its many forms — colorful, slimy, freezing, explosive — during the school’s annual Art and Science Night, held Friday, March 27, in the main gym.

Art and Science Night gives Cascade View students a place to share their learning with the community, said teacher Dyame Lemming.

“Their creativity and artistic abilities are inspiring,” he said.

Spurring investigation, the science and art night helps students look at the world in new ways, making them more aware of how nature runs in cycles.

The evening included displays of student-created art, a school spelling bee, and rows of experiments conducted by the students themselves, on everything from vacuums to eggs.

“I learned that vinegar can do a lot,” said student Sarah Troy.

She put a chicken egg in vinegar, and watched as the vinegar slowly dissolved the shell.

The gooey egg, in its bowl of vinegar, was front and center at Troy’s table, for all to experience.

“You can touch it with one finger, but be very careful,” she said. “It can break.”

In the center of the gym, Mount Si High School students added to the fun with whimsical science experiments.

Teens used liquid nitrogen to make some unusual treats that children gazed at in awe, then ate.

Cold air blew from the nose of Cascade View fourth grader Riley Laase, as he munched on cookies chilled by the super-cold substance.

Students lined up to watch Mount Si freshman Matt Olson shrink down marshmallows in a vaccuum chamber. The treats lost about half their volume, before Olson opened the chamber and handed out the diminished treats.

“It’s so awesome,” students said as they watched the candy collapse.

Cascade View students were strongly encouraged to participate.

Preparation for the science fair took some families more than a month.

Cascade View parent Cliff Brown said his fourth grade daughter Lindsey took a lot to heart from the science projects.

Lindsey now understands the steps of the scientific — how to observe a process, set a hypothesis, and test it.

“She’s learned how to present what she did,” he said.

“When families show interest in their child’s education, they’re modeling not only with their words, but their actions, how important school is,” Lemming told the Valley Record. “The teaching and learning process is never ending.”

Lemming said his favorite part of the experience was walking into school and seeking walls covered in children’s art works.

“During the week leading up to art and science night, the walls in our school came alive,” providing an insight in the culture created by the students, he said.

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