Community

Past Time

A driver with a three-horse team harvests grain at Meadowbrook Farm in this undated photo. Meadowbrook’s 1,200 acres have been farmed by European settlers since 1858, and it became a dairy farm in 1904. Some 460 acres of the original farm took on park status about 15 years ago, preserving the heritage of the place. Anyone with information about the farmer in the photo, or when it was taken, is asked to contact the Snoqualmie Valley Historical Museum at (425) 785-2641. This picture may be purchased at www.snoqualmievalleymuseum.org by clicking on the “order photos online” link. - Courtesy photo
A driver with a three-horse team harvests grain at Meadowbrook Farm in this undated photo. Meadowbrook’s 1,200 acres have been farmed by European settlers since 1858, and it became a dairy farm in 1904. Some 460 acres of the original farm took on park status about 15 years ago, preserving the heritage of the place. Anyone with information about the farmer in the photo, or when it was taken, is asked to contact the Snoqualmie Valley Historical Museum at (425) 785-2641. This picture may be purchased at www.snoqualmievalleymuseum.org by clicking on the “order photos online” link.
— image credit: Courtesy photo

25 Years Ago

Thursday, Aug. 4, 1983

• Teacher’s union officials in Snoqualmie Valley School District 410, concerned about a lack of progress in contract negotiations, announced that the teachers will not return to work without a new contract. Members of the SEA voted overwhelmingly on the last day of school not to report to work without a contract.

• Fall City’s main business street would have improved parking and landscaping under a proposal from King County. An improvement scheme was presented to the public and shown to the Fall City business and professional association. “Residents and business people generally agree we need better parking and landscaping,” community planner Craig Larson told the business group.

50 Years Ago

Thursday, Aug. 7, 1958

• Friday morning, Aug. 1, a telephone call from Mrs. William Ryba caused the North Bend office to turn detective and try to solve the mystery of “who climbed the lofty heights of Mount Si and erected what looks to be a 15-foot white cross on the summit of the haystack? Sure enough, there it was, facing east and west and gleaming white against the sky.

• Snoqualmie’s “Bridge Across the Kwai” will just about span the gap between the river banks by the time you read these lines. The trestle has been inching across the river, with the 30-ton pile driver the star performer for dozens of “Bridge Superintendents” like Otto Reinig, Bill Stoddard, Riley Wenzell, Jim Bennett and a hundred kids and their dogs. Mill homes that are now across the river will be moved intact across the bridge.

75 Years Ago

Thursday, Aug. 3, 1933

• Jimmie Churchill of North Bend is one fisherman who does not have to come home and tell about “the one that got away.” Jimmie, a grade school youngster, has all the fish in the streams around here tagged, so no one was surprised to see him display in Lee’s store a catch of 17 fine trout.

• The North Bend stage line will discontinue its daily trip to Easton. On call, Mr. Arneston advises that he will take passengers as far as eight miles east of North Bend.

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