Community

Trio display artwork in Snoqualmie Sharing their visions

Valley artists Sandra Robinson, Michael McDevitt, and Diane Solomon present a showing of their work at KoKo Beans Coffee House, including, from left, “Fall City Farm,” “Peonies” and “Equus Musica: Sylvan Revels.” - Seth Truscott / Snoqualmie Valley Record
Valley artists Sandra Robinson, Michael McDevitt, and Diane Solomon present a showing of their work at KoKo Beans Coffee House, including, from left, “Fall City Farm,” “Peonies” and “Equus Musica: Sylvan Revels.”
— image credit: Seth Truscott / Snoqualmie Valley Record

A trio of Snoqualmie Valley painters have joined forces to give locals a glimpse into their artistic lives.

Sandra Robinson, Diane Solomon and Michael McDevitt selected works for a 40-piece show through Labor Day at KoKo Beans Coffee House in downtown Snoqualmie.

The trio, members of the Mount Si Artists Guild, were also visible at locations in Snoqualmie, creating art during Railroad Days.

People could be surprised by some of art, created by local talent, on display.

McDevitt, a former commercial illustrator and art director, said he has had a life-long addiction to art.

“Real things are beautiful,” said McDevitt, who teaches art to students in the region but, like Robinson and Solomon, hopes to make a name for himself as an artist.

Robinson, who works in pencil as well as in paint, describes herself as a country person. Among other subjects, she taught art in schools. After raising a family and retiring, Robinson devoted herself to her art.

“I work in cooperation with the talent the Lord gave me, and the beauty of this area,” she said. “I love the great outdoors.”

Solomon, a Valley resident for over 30 years, grew up with a love of horses, and a love of drawing.

However, “my life just went drastically the other way,” she said. Solomon was in a construction family, and got into the business with her husband. When she left the industry six years ago, she immediately returned to art.

Her current theme is using vintage paper, 80 to 120 years old, as the backdrop for her art.

The artists thanked KoKo Beans owner John Good for lending his space for their show.

“We thank him for opening his establishment to art, and letting us show our work and introducing it to residents,” Robinson said.

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