Community

Past Time

When a fire wiped out their store in 1908, brothers Dio and Otto Reinig made do with this tent store, located roughly where the Sno-Valley Eagles club is now, until their new store could be built. Today, that store is known as Carmichael’s True Value Hardware. Pictured at the tent store, from left, are Otto Reinig, Bill Dickson, Dio Reinig, Minnie Reinig, and at right, Margaretha and Leonard Reinig, parents of the brothers. This picture and other historic Valley images may be purchased at www.snoqualmievalleymuseum.org by clicking on the “order photos online” link. - Courtesy photo
When a fire wiped out their store in 1908, brothers Dio and Otto Reinig made do with this tent store, located roughly where the Sno-Valley Eagles club is now, until their new store could be built. Today, that store is known as Carmichael’s True Value Hardware. Pictured at the tent store, from left, are Otto Reinig, Bill Dickson, Dio Reinig, Minnie Reinig, and at right, Margaretha and Leonard Reinig, parents of the brothers. This picture and other historic Valley images may be purchased at www.snoqualmievalleymuseum.org by clicking on the “order photos online” link.
— image credit: Courtesy photo

25 Years Ago

Thursday, July 28, 1983

• What has four legs, four eyes, two wheels and can travel 50 miles per hour downhill? That’s what a lot of people must have thought when they saw the Boyds of Spring Glen go flying by on the highway last month on their two-wheeled contraption. The Boyds used their custom-made tandem bike to go on a 1,000-mile trip from here to Glacier Park in Montana, and then to Lake Louise in Canada.

• Picking up litter may not sound like a very glamorous job, but for two Valley teenagers, it’s a route to a bit of fame. Tanya Grim of North Bend and Dennis Roth of Snoqualmie are featured in a television commercial promoting the state Department of Ecology’s roadside litter pick-up program. Tanya is the poster girl for the litter control program, so look for her face on litter pickup posters.

50 Years Ago

Thursday, July 31, 1958

• Members of the Community Hall Steering Committee and a group of interested Valleyites got together at the Hall Monday night, and the result is a brand new organization, the Snoqualmie Valley Young Men’s Christian Association, a project to be owned, operated and developed by and for the people of the Valley. For many years, the Snoqualmie Falls “Y” has been a company-sponsored facility. Weyerhaeuser decided to give the building to the community, rather than demolish it, if enough people of the community showed interest in taking it over.

• An avalanche of prizes poured in this week to make the four-day Snoqualmie Days celebration this weekend one of the biggest give-away shows in Valley history. Firemen and the VFW have arranged for a new entertainment feature called the “Dunk Tank.” It’s a very special kind of baseball throw; if you hit the target, the victim seated over the tank is plopped into the water. A number of true-blue Snoqualmie businessmen have “volunteered” as targets.

75 Years Ago

Thursday, July 27, 1933

• Fire of unknown origin totally destroyed the homes of Mrs. Annie Askey and Mrs. D.B. Woods in Snoqualmie last Saturday afternoon, at about 4 p.m. Mrs. Askey’s little house had just been improved by the addition of two rooms and finished on the inside, and while insurance of about $500 was carried, it will not be enough to reimburse the aged woman for but a small part of her loss. The Woods home was completely destroyed. Mr. Woods, who lay in a coma in his house, was carried to a place of safety on a mattress.

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