Snoqualmie business owners check out new downtown plan

Armed with a row of graphics showing wider sidewalks, lots of colorful signs, broad vistas and pedestrian-friendly trails, consultant Tom Beckwith asked Snoqualmie business and building owners to consider the possibilities of a redeveloped downtown.

  • Thursday, October 2, 2008 9:26pm
  • Business

Armed with a row of graphics showing wider sidewalks, lots of colorful signs, broad vistas and pedestrian-friendly trails, consultant Tom Beckwith asked Snoqualmie business and building owners to consider the possibilities of a redeveloped downtown.

Beckwith, head of LaConner-based Beckwith Consulting Group, led the discussion, explaining how the city could energize its downtown core by bringing things down to a pedestrian scale.

Beckwith touted installing 12-foot-wide sidewalks, pedestrian-scale street lights, glass awnings and street trees on the retail side of Railroad Avenue as a way to encourage foot traffic, while the opposite side of Railroad Avenue, fronting the Northwest Railway Museum, was discussed as a possible route for a walking and bike trail.

The pedestrian improvements do have some tradeoffs, with parking stalls eliminated. One option is putting diagonal parking on the retail side of the street. To make room, Beckwith talked about designating bike lanes on side streets, such as Maple Street and Falls Avenue. Dedicated cyclists would continue to use the car lanes.

The new vision of downtown also includes making the Snoqualmie River more a part of downtown.

“There was strong support for making King Street and River Street view access points,” said Bob Cole, the city of Snoqualmie’s economic development specialist. Drawing pedestrians down King Street to a riverfront park, and taking advantage of downtown’s scenic views, are among the new strategies.

For the complete story, subscribe to the Valley Record ( 425) 888-2311

More in Business

The Centralia Power Plant is a coal-burning plant owned by TransAlta which supplies 380 megawatts to Puget Sound Energy. It is located in Lewis County and slated to shut down by 2025. Aaron Kunkler/Staff Photo
National report outlines climate change’s course for the Northwest

More fires, floods and drought appear to be on their way for Washington state.

Mike Seal, left, and his son Ryan are owners of the Sigillo Cellars winery which is hoping to build a new production facility in downtown Snoqualmie. Aaron Kunkler/staff photo
Sigillo Cellars closes purchase on King Street Lot

Sigillo Cellars have purchased the vacant lot on the corner SE King Street in downtown Snoqualmie.

Snoqualmie Council approves Salish expansion project master plan application

The Salish Lodge and Spa Expansion project has passed another milestone on the path to construction.

Veteran’s, Josh Harris and Asa Palagi start security company in early 2018 called Cascadia Global Security. Photo courtesy of CGS.
Two veterans launch private security company

Asa Palagi and Josh Harris start Cascadia Global Security to provide personalized security

Back Alley Brew shuts down

The drive-thru espresso stand was closed after a permitting dispute with the county.

The winter real estate market

An uptick in transactional activity over past few weeks.

Stakeholders pose during a ribbon cutting ceremony for new deli at Snoqualmie Casino. Courtesy photo
Snoqualmie Casino celebrates new deli

Design inspired by Pacific Northwest nature and tribal traditions.

From Snoqualmie to nuclear subs, Zetec builds inspection tech

The Snoqualmie-based company builds ultrasound and eddy current testing tech.

Snoqualmie Valley Hospital CEO resigns; recommends interim CEO

Snoqualmie Valley Hospital CEO Tom Parker announced his resignation and recommended an interim CEO.

It’s time to get clear on recycling

A column by Michelle Metzler, Waste Management recycling education and outreach manager

Fall housing market shifts, but still seller’s market

Residential real estate snapshot from John L. Scott

Housing market showing balance

Good news for buyers