Order your Thanksgiving box of locally-grown food from Snoqualmie Valley Farmers Cooperative

  • Wednesday, October 25, 2017 10:41am
  • Business

When Farmer Matt Tregoning of Sol to Seed Farm helped found the Snoqualmie Valley Farmers Cooperative, he had a clear vision. “We wanted to help new, small farmers in our valley reach eaters.”

This year, the co-op will continue its Thanksgiving box tradition to further that goal. The box feeds six to eight people and includes recipes and nearly all ingredients needed to make seven side dishes and a pie. Local, pasture-raised turkeys are also available.

“The Thanksgiving box showcases the diversity of things grown in our valley, which we are really proud of,” Tregoning says. “It even includes local flour for your pumpkin pie!”

The menu includes roasted roots, delicata squash fries, brown butter kale, as well as traditional favorites such as cranberry sauce and pumpkin pie. All produce is from the Snoqualmie Valley and everything is from within 170 miles. Order a Thanksgiving box at www.snovalleycoop.com/thanksgiving-box.

Snoqualmie Valley Farmers Cooperative now includes 23 farms that work together to market and deliver their vegetables throughout the greater Seattle area.

“The promise of the co-op is efficiency,” explains SVFC General Manager Hannah Cavendish-Palmer. “The farms in our valley are small and it makes sense for them to work together. If the co-op can take care of distribution and marketing, our farmers have more time to farm.”

Environmentally responsible farming practices brought these farms together. “These farmers feel so strongly about protecting the environment that they wrote their own healthy planet pledge,” says Cavendish-Palmer.

The pledge goes beyond organic growing methods and includes labor and animal welfare practices as well.

In addition to the Thanksgiving boxes, the cooperative runs a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program and sales to restaurants, hospitals, and schools.

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