Miller’s Mercantile, on the corner of Bird Street and Main, will close at the end of the year. (Courtesy Photo)

Miller’s Mercantile, on the corner of Bird Street and Main, will close at the end of the year. (Courtesy Photo)

Miller’s Mercantile to close in Carnation at end of the year

Carnation’s historic mercantile, arts gallery and community gathering place, Miller’s Mercantile, will close its doors at the end of the year.

  • Monday, November 13, 2017 1:02pm
  • Business

A Carnation Main Street mainstay, Miller’s Mercantile, is closing at the end of the year. The shop will offer increasing discounts on merchandise through the month of December and will feature local artists and craftspeople on Small Business Saturday, Nov. 25.

The building that houses Miller’s was built in 1925, and its namesake is a nod to Miller’s Dry Goods, which was run by Howard and Marion Miller from 1938 to 1982. The Miller’s Dry Goods store was known throughout the Valley for providing clothing and equipment to farmers, loggers, and their families.

Howard and Marion were beloved in the community. They ordered and secured all the school lettermen’s jackets, reviewed the report cards brought by the students for their review, and announced all the games for the Tolt High School.

The store is currently owned and operated by Lee Grumman, long-time Carnation resident, and similarly community minded. She has served on the city’s planning board and currently, City Council, and has volunteered in the community in many capacities over the years.

Grumman purchased the building in 2004, and spent many hours renovating the building to its earlier glory. She first established a community and arts center, and in 2007 opened a retail shop. Over the past 13 years, she has hosted movies, art shows, and community gatherings at Miller’s in addition to selling locally made and vintage merchandise.

Grumman has decided that 13 years is just about right, and would like to turn her attention toward other interests. She said she’ll miss seeing all of the great folks that come in regularly, but will certainly see them around town.

The store will be open through the end of December, as well as on Dec. 2, Christmas in Carnation.

Lee Grumman, Carnation City Councilwoman and owner of the community gathering place Miller’s Mercantile, has decided to close up shop in December, to pursue other interests. (File Photo)

Lee Grumman, Carnation City Councilwoman and owner of the community gathering place Miller’s Mercantile, has decided to close up shop in December, to pursue other interests. (File Photo)

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